Bacopa sp.”Roraima”

Hello again!
I hope all of you have been doing well 🙂 For my next couple of posts I will be covering a variety of stem plants, changing it up from my usual rosette-oriented posts. Today’s post will be on the unique Bacopa sp.”Roraima” which hails from Brazil. While it is not anything new, it does have some unique qualities which set it apart from your typical “Bacopa”-look.

BacopaRoraima

Right off the bat what stands out to you and in my opinion makes this Bacopa something quite special is the long and curled leaves. When one thinks of a Bacopa, you think of round, circular, short leaves, but this one is different. The leaves are about an 1 1/2 inches in length out from the stem, and as you can see they curl in a downward direction, and inward, down the length of the leaf. Something you may not notice, unless you look carefully is that where the leaf meets the stem, some of the larger leaves have “ears” that face downward.

One other thing you can see very faintly in the close up picture below, is that there is a slight pinkish coloration on the crown. The crown of this particular variety will turn a light pink color if given a high amount of light.

Bacopa Roraima

This Bacopa really only requires a medium amount of light to just survive. It is easy to grow, and fast at doing so. Water parameters should be soft and acidic water at 20-28 degrees Celsius. Propagation can be done by cuttings.

Bacopa Roraima

I hope you enjoyed this short write up on this interesting Bacopa variety from Brazil.
If you like what you see, please leave a comment!
Have a good one people!
Inspire91

Echinodorus Saturn 2000

Hello all!
My last post was about Echinodorus opacus “Goncalo” 2003, today’s post will be about another very special sword plant, Echinodorus “Saturn” 2000. Generally speaking “Saturn” is very similar to opacus, in growth, requirements, popularity, price, etc.

E.Saturn leaf

This is another one of the more popular and rare Sword plants in the hobby. The reason for this is it’s limited importation and its very very slow growth. The 2000 on the name denotes, the year that it was imported, at least into Japan. According to my source, there was only one importation of this sword also, just like the opacus from the last post.

A short story behind this plant is that the collector of this specific 2003 variety, never told another person where he collected it, and he actually passed away. So when he passed away, the collection site of this “Saturn” 2000 variety went with him. There are actually two different imported varieties of “Saturn” one in 2000 and one in 2003. The only difference with the 2003 variety is that the leaves are wider.

In terms of price, this variety actually commands a bit higher price than opacus. Not by much, we’re talking about maybe $50-$100 more per plant. Overall we’re looking at approximately $550-600 for a larger specimen.

E. Saturn several

Just like E. opacus, this sword may not be the most colorful or the most flamboyant in terms of leaf shape, but there is definitely a few characteristics that really make this one stand out from the rest. In my eye at least, the aspects of this Sword that catch my eye are:
1. The plant is a very hard-to-the-touch, it is not a soft and flimsy species.
2. It stays relatively small compared to most other Echinodorus. Whereas most other swords get quite large sometimes massive, I have only seen this one get to about 7-8in. tall and wide.
3. The leaves are long and ovate in shape, about 3-4inch long and 1-2inch wide leaves.
4. Some may see this as a draw back but I see it as a positive. This sword is a very slow grower, typically growing 1 full size leaf in a month, maybe longer. What makes this a positive for me is that it requires little if any trimming or pruning, I just leave it alone and it does its thing! We all know how swords can easily become a massive “light-blocker” or a “running-mess”.
5. This is not a hard Sword plant to grow, it is quite easy, just give it soft (2-3 degrees) and acidic (5-6ph) water.

This is quite another “gem” of a sword for the hardcore plant-collector! Personally opacus is my #1 favorite Echinodorus, but this is firmly my #2 favorite. Hopefully someday you will have the chance to obtain both of these beauties!

Thank you for checking out this post! I hope you enjoyed it! Please leave a comment! ☺
Take care all!
Inspire91

Echinodorus opacus “Goncalo” 2003

Hello all!
I know that I said that my next post would be on another Bucephelandra variety, but I think I am going to change it up today and do a post on a gem of a Sword plant by the name of Echinodorus opacus “Goncalo” 2003. (“Goncalo” is pronounced “Gonsalo”)

Echino. opacus small specimen
These smaller specimens would fetch about $300 a plant. Don’t you love how compact this plant is when it’s in it’s smaller stages of growth!?

This is one of the more popular and rare Sword plants in the hobby. The reason for this is it’s limited importation and its very very slow growth. The 2003 on the name denotes, the year that it was imported, at least into Japan. According to my source, there was only one importation of this opacus, and that was in 2003. As the name also denotes the collection site for this Sword was from Rio Goncalo, Brazil.

This Sword typically commands a high price, obviously due to its rarity and slow growth. When I first saw a specimen of this plant in Japan back around 2003, it was on sale for about $500 for a 4-5inch tall plant. To this day it still commands that price, maybe a bit cheaper due to the fact that by now, hobbyists have propagated it and spread it around a fair bit.

Ech.opacus
These full-grown specimens would fetch about $500+ a plant!

This Sword may not be the most colorful or the most flamboyant in terms of leaf shape, but there is definitely a few characteristics that really make this one stand out from the rest. In my eye at least, the aspects of this Sword that catch my eye are:
1. The plant is a very hard-to-the-touch, it is not a soft and flimsy species. Typically plants that are this type of “hard” means they aren’t really suited for life underwater, and also it typically means it will be a slow growing plant.
2. It stays relatively small compared to most other Echinodorus. Whereas most other swords get quite large sometimes massive, I have only seen this one get to about 3-4in. tall and 4-5in. wide. This one stays very compact. In fact one of the defining characteristics is that it has almost no stem to the leaves.
3. The leaves are quite round, and they can slightly bend a bit, with a sharp tip. They get to about 3in. width and 2in. length.
4. Some may see this as a draw back but I see it as a positive. Original wild opacus is a very very slow growing plant, typically growing 1 full size leaf in a month, maybe longer. What makes this a positive for me is that it requires little if any trimming or pruning, I just leave it alone and it does its thing! We all know how swords can easily become a massive “light-blocker” or a “running-mess”.
5. This is not a hard Sword plant to grow, it is quite easy, just give it soft (2-3 degrees) and acidic (5-6ph) water.
6. The veins on the leaves of this plant are a bright-green, very visible and makes for a nice contrast to the dark-green of the webbing of the leaves.

Echino.opacus

I hope that I could bring out all of the great aspects of this rare Echinodorus to all of you. Again it may not be the most flashy of Sword plants, but it is quite the “gem” for the hardcore plant-collector.
Thank you for checking out this post! I hope you enjoyed it! My next post may be on another rare Echinodorus, but don’t hold me to it! 😛 Please leave a comment! ☺
Take care all!
Inspire91

Favorite Hyphessobrycon!

Hello again!
Today’s post will be back to fish, and specifically Characin, and even more specifically, Hyphessobrycon!

Hyphessobrycon are among one of the largest genus’ of the Characoid family. These relatively small sized South American Tetras come in a variety of shapes and colors, but among the huge variety of patters, colors, and shapes, I really only have a fancy for a few of them. For the ones that are pictured below, the males generally will have longer fins, and be more slender in shape, whereas the females are more plump and have much shorter fins.

My taste in fish usually has a good balance of two features in fish: color and finnage. My favorite genus of fish which have clear example species that fit this criteria for me is the genus Apistogramma. These are small fish, with beautiful finnage and amazing colors.

Nonetheless back to Hyphessobrycon for today!

Hyphessobrycon copelandi
These beauties may not have the most amazing colors, but their subtle red/violet (depending upon locality) colors are made up with their fantastic finnage, the males of this species have a tendency to spar quite a bit. In my opinion the white lining on the fins highlight their most beautiful feature.
Hyph. copelandi

Hyphessobrycon epicharis
This is a relatively larger Hyphessobrycon, the pair that I worked with, were 2 inches long and about and 1 1/2 inches tall. This one definitely fits the color and finnage departments well in my opinion, with red and yellow hues, and tall finnage. A bit more, mellow than the copelandi.
Hyph. epicharis

Hyphessobrycon takasei “Coffee bean tetra”
This again isn’t one of the more colorful species, but the one thing that catches my eye the most, is the large spots on either side of it’s body. Many Hyphessobrycon share this “spot” but the takasei, has one of the largest! It’s just an odd little quirk about this specific species that I have a fancy for.
Hyph. takasei

Thanks for taking a look at this post!
If you like what you see please leave a comment!
Inspire91

Extravagant Corydoras

Hello all!
Sorry I haven`t kept up with my usual once a week posts, but today there will be one about one of my favorite genus of catfish, the Corydoras.

Corydoras are an armored genus of catfish which hail from streams and small backwater areas of the Amazon river basin in South America. They are a schooling species of catfish that, in the wild, can be found in groups of up to 100 individuals or more. Raising these fish are quite easy, they aren`t very sensitive to water parameters (prefer soft acidic water), although they can be sensitive to water quality. Also when Keeping Corydoras, try to be sure to scrub the bottom of the tank, or if you have a substrate, sift through it to get the detritus out of it, as Corydoras, especially wild specimens, tend to have sensitive barbels(whiskers) and if you let bacteria and such build up where their whiskers are most in contact (bottom of the tank) they sometimes can get infections at their mouth, which can be quite pesky to get rid of.

As a side note: Really try to avoid getting pricked by one of their spines of their 1st dorsal fin ray, and 1st rays of their pectoral fins, of course it hurts, but it THROBS, as I believe there is a mild toxin released from the spines. Trust me I know how much it hurts, it is quite uncomfortable!

Corydoras “Super” Schwartzi
The body pattern can vary quite a bit, but in Japan they rate the quality of this and a few other Corydoras by how well the horizontal lines along the body line up well making clean straight lines. The more straight and clean the body stripes are, the better “quality” the fish is and of course the more expensive it gets. I`m sure that you`ll agree that cleaner lines make a more attractive fish. The sexual dimorphism between males and females is not distinct as both males and females share the same characteristics, but that the females are a bit wider (As seen from the top) and a bit larger in general.
Cory super schwartzi
Cory super schwartzi

Corydoras pulcher
Corydoras pulcher
This is one of the longer-nosed species of “white fin” Corydoras. The tall cream-colored dorsal fin, with it’s extended dorsal rays is the premier characteristic of this Corydoras. The first few dorsal rays of this fish can get long enough that they will curl back towards the fish, making a small “loop” at the tip of the dorsal fin, seems odd when you think about it, but it is really quite beautiful. The sexual dimorphism between males and females is not distinct as both males and females share the same characteristics, but that the females are a bit wider (As seen from the top) and a bit larger in general.
Cory pulcher
Cory pulcher

Corydoras “Super” eques
I don’t believe this Cory gets its due amount of attention, in terms of its coloration. There are other forms (which don’t even come close in color) of eques out there, I like to believe this is the true form of this species. The green coloration is actually metallic (as you can see from the bad over exposure 😛 where certain areas of the green mirror my flash) and that color’s contrast against the orange-red spots behind the head and in the fins are very eye-catching.
Cory Super eques

Corydoras pantanalensis (C5)
This is that extra, AMAZING Corydoras I was speaking of, this is nothing especially new, (once known as “C5), but this is still quite the colorful and attractive Cory. This Cory has a base body color of metallic green but the males have a mottled pattern over their whole body, fins included (the fins can also get quite long also), and on top of that pattern they have a metallic sheen. There is a distinct sexual dimorphism with this fish, when the males are on top of a dark substrate, or in a breeding mood, the pattern becomes really dark almost black, but with the green body color still showing through the pattern and still with the metallic sheen on top of all that. This fish in that situation is quite the sight to see.
Cory pantanalensis male

The females are such a contrast to the males, as they are a bit simple, with the green body color and no pattern, also with most other Corydoras, this sex is the larger of the two.
Cory pantanalensis female
I hope you enjoyed this post about the a few dwarf catfish of the Genus Corydoras! My next post, in about a week, will most likely be something related to aquatic plants, I am thinking something along the lines of wild Microsorium (Java fern) varieties. These plants took a lot of searching for, and they cost me quite a bit of cash, we`re talking in the 100s of dollars for a cutting, want to see what they look like!? Keep checking back here, Aquatic Quotient or Aquatic Plant Central for new posts to this blog!

Sincerely,
Inspire91

Who else loves Apistogramma!?

Hello all!
Today there won’t be any aquatic plants in this post…sorry 😛
Although today there will be a nice little post about a few beautiful dwarf cichlids, of the genus Apistogramma!
This is by far my favorite genus of fish for the reason that they are a small-sized genus of fish, and they hit 2 main points that I seek for in fish, which are a nice mix of nice fins and beautiful color. I’m not saying all, but many fish are very strong in one point, but lack in the other.
I mainly focused upon wild specimens of Apistogramma as I have found those much more beautiful than any aquarium strain. Although generally this brings up a lot more difficulty in breeding and even raising this genus of fish, if you are planning on keeping wild specimens. They are much more sensitive to water parameters and quality when they are wild, and are not accustomed to the aquarium environment, like the aquarium strains.
Check a few of these dwarf cichlid beauties below!

Apisto. Rotkeil
This particular species lacks flashy colors which are a staple of the genus, but it definitely makes up for it with its beautiful finnage, as you can see!

Apisto. baenschi
Previously known as Apisto. “Inka 50”, this is by far my favorite of the “Panduro” group of Apistogramma, mainly because of the tall dorsal finnage. The “Panduro” group (Apisto. martini/panduro/baenschi/njisseni), as a whole aren’t very difficult to breed/raise, they are more forgiving in terms of water parameters/quality.

Apisto. Viejita 3
This is by far one of my favorites! Most people have seen or worked with viejita 1 and 2, both of which are generally speaking red/yellow. This one is unique in that is it as you can see, blue, yellow, and white! Not many people have seen this # of viejita, as it is quite rare.

Apisto. mendezi
This Apisto doesn’t have the largest fins, but it definitely makes up for it with the flashy metallic colors and body patterns. Given the right lighting and water quality, this one shines very brightly!

I hope you enjoyed this post about my favorite genus of fish! I know there isn’t too much information on breeding and raising, but this is a post mainly for the eyes 🙂

Thanks for taking a look!
Inspire91